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Getting Dedicated to Digital Proofing

(July 2006) posted on Tue Jul 11, 2006

Discover how a dedicated digital proofing system can accurately represent your production prints and save you money at the same time.


By Mike Ruff

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One thing you must realize about time is that you can't create more of it. We all have the same amount of it—8760 hours in a regular calendar year. Working harder does not create more time. Working more efficiently through predictability just uses time more effectively to produce more of what makes us money.

The principle that predictability equals profitability is more applicable to the printing environment than any other. Print companies that have chosen to become more efficient with their time by being able to hit a predictable target with their printing make a lot more money than those who just work hard. The reality is that every hour wasted is gone forever. Every hour wasted adds to the costs printers are forced to charge.

Consider the following example: If a company produces 15 process-color jobs per week, and its cost for press time is $500 per hour, it's losing $500 for every hour the company's staff spends fiddling with color adjustments at press. If this shop produces 15 jobs per week and averages just two 20 minute delays on each job as color is adjusted, the cost of the delays amounts to a costly $260,000 per year.

The good news is that if you can capture this lost revenue, you gain the $260,000 as pure profit! So if your net profit is 10% per year, that would have the same financial impact as adding $2.6 million to your gross annual sales. Now do you see how important an accurate, calibrated proof is to the process? My point is that getting a bigger truck is not the answer. Increasing profit on existing work is the solution. You need an accurate and calibrated proof to save the time and expense of going to press and having a surprise come during the process, whether it involves screen or digital equipment. Small color surprises cost big bucks over a very short time.


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