User login

Screen printing CDs

Posted on Sat, 18 Feb 2006 at 20:46



Can anyone point me in the right direction for single-color, multicolor, and full color, screen printing onto CD/DVD media?

How is this done?
What are the smallest ecconomical runs possible?
What are the various technologies out there?
Costs? Specs?
I got a million questions.
If anyone has knoledge in CD/DVD printing it would be very helpful if I could have an exchange.

Thank you,
Jeff - Take 1 Studios

Location of Opportunity or Item

Comments

Anonymous says: CDs are printed much like t-shirts, with a carosel system being the most common, although I've also seen semi auto shuttle printers. The machines are much smaller and enclosed than a typical screen press, ...

CDs are printed much like t-shirts, with a carosel system being the most common, although I've also seen semi auto shuttle printers. The machines are much smaller and enclosed than a typical screen press, with auto feed and takeoff, the cd held by suction in a slightly recessed jig and advanced automatically in secquence depending on the colours.

Small minipresses print the disc, and they then rotate under a UV dryer and advance to the next colour head.
Print speeds on autos are in the 3600 per hour range. A number of companies produce printers for this in 1 col up6 col configuration.

We manufacture a small one colour hand press. (look under products at www.squeegeeville.com )This is good for servicing short run and custom imprint cds for DIY bands, or smaller businesses who present work on Cd and want it to look professional. I can make a few $$$ printing with this, we run 250 per hour by hand.

Most short run CD work in the world is done using labels or specialized inkjet or thermal printers. This allows for full colour work, but the inks don't stick well or they look cheap.

Generally, I find a lot of people that contact me to print CDs always seem to want to print full colour. This is almost impossible on a one colour press with the reregistration problem. When you look at the bulk of popular recordings, they are mostly one or 2 colour.

I always thought there was a market in the local short and medium custom run, especially for people running replication/recording operations on a small scale. When you look at the sheer volume of CDs, and it's widespread use as a communication medium by business, the ability to present a pro product when you hand over a consulting report, or a set of photos, or a test pressing of an album would make business sense. Custom printed blanks would look so much better than a $5,000 report handed over on a walmart disc with some pen scribbles on it.

posted on: Sun, 02/19/2006 - 12:59pm
Anonymous says: CDs are printed much like t-shirts, with a carosel system being the most common, although I've also seen semi auto shuttle printers. The machines are much smaller and enclosed than a typical screen press, ...

CDs are printed much like t-shirts, with a carosel system being the most common, although I've also seen semi auto shuttle printers. The machines are much smaller and enclosed than a typical screen press, with auto feed and takeoff, the cd held by suction in a slightly recessed jig and advanced automatically in secquence depending on the colours.

Small minipresses print the disc, and they then rotate under a UV dryer and advance to the next colour head.
Print speeds on autos are in the 3600 per hour range. A number of companies produce printers for this in 1 col up6 col configuration.

We manufacture a small one colour hand press. (look under products at www.squeegeeville.com )This is good for servicing short run and custom imprint cds for DIY bands, or smaller businesses who present work on Cd and want it to look professional. I can make a few $$$ printing with this, we run 250 per hour by hand.

Most short run CD work in the world is done using labels or specialized inkjet or thermal printers. This allows for full colour work, but the inks don't stick well or they look cheap.

Generally, I find a lot of people that contact me to print CDs always seem to want to print full colour. This is almost impossible on a one colour press with the reregistration problem. When you look at the bulk of popular recordings, they are mostly one or 2 colour.

I always thought there was a market in the local short and medium custom run, especially for people running replication/recording operations on a small scale. When you look at the sheer volume of CDs, and it's widespread use as a communication medium by business, the ability to present a pro product when you hand over a consulting report, or a set of photos, or a test pressing of an album would make business sense. Custom printed blanks would look so much better than a $5,000 report handed over on a walmart disc with some pen scribbles on it.

posted on: Sun, 02/19/2006 - 1:00pm
chaosprinting says: www.systauto.com/cdpallet/cdpallet.html this company makes a pallet for doing multi color prints with a single color press, the idea is good, even if the pallets are expensive. thermal printers are good, ...

www.systauto.com/cdpallet/cdpallet.html

this company makes a pallet for doing multi color prints with a single color press, the idea is good, even if the pallets are expensive.

thermal printers are good, and the really expesive ones look excellent

another possible option is to do a full color print with a inkjet printable cd, and then print a clear solvent ink ontop of it to make it durable. havenot tested this yet.

printing as few as 50 cds is generally still cheaper than thermal or inkjet printing and looks better, and is a tougher print

levi

www.chaosprinting.com

posted on: Sat, 05/20/2006 - 3:31pm
gary says: cd printing is simple and can actually be done on a table. its like plastic signs. there are a lot of manufacturers out there. posted on: Sat, 09/30/2006 - 2:29am
nils says: http://84.50.84.46/~upload1/dvd.cmyk.mov It is 60 MB video of my screen-printer in action. I created a forum discprinters.forumer.com Please post your questions there so we can make this forum alive. posted on: Sat, 10/28/2006 - 10:06pm

Did you enjoy this article? Click here to subscribe to the magazine.