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STicking signs

Posted on Sat, 19 Nov 2005 at 10:24



I am new to all of this and need some tech help. I have a small sign business and when I print the coro signs, they come out fine, I put them on the rack and wait and not matter how dry they feel, if I stack them vertically along the wall to get my orders ready to go out, whe I go out the next morning to box them, half of them will be stuck together. I am getting pretty frustrated hearing the sound of two pieces of coro being pulled apart due to stuck ink. I am using Color FX Graphic ink and adding retarder like the rep said to.
I am curious if maybe it is where I live. Here in central FL we have a lot of humidity a lot of the time. I close the shop and run a dehumidifier and an air conditioner overnight after a printing day in order to try and get the ink dry. It has helped and the cooler weather with less humidity has also helped but hopefully I will not be out of business by next summer so I need to solve the problem. Any ideas?

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Comments

Anonymous says: Tammy, Buy Naz-Dar Corogloss ink! It's the best. I've never had any problems. Here in northern Illinois it get's hot and humid in august and my ink dries in less than a hour.. With a fan I can print 10 ...

Tammy,
Buy Naz-Dar Corogloss ink!
It's the best. I've never had any problems.
Here in northern Illinois it get's hot and humid in august and my ink dries in less than a hour.. With a fan I can print 10 pc's 2 sided in 15 minutes. I let them dry for a half hour before putting a second color on.
Bruce

posted on: Fri, 11/25/2005 - 6:40pm
Anonymous says: Both of these inks are solvent based, so they are extremely sensitive to environmental conditions. You will get better results with Bruce's suggestion. Coroplast has it's problems too that doesn't help ...

Both of these inks are solvent based, so they are extremely sensitive to environmental conditions.

You will get better results with Bruce's suggestion. Coroplast has it's problems too that doesn't help the situation.

You mention retarder as being used. It's the cheap/lazy way out. Don't get me wrong it's not made and offered to you because it's worthless, but it can cause more problems than solve. Used in what may appear to be a common sense application can have side effects. One obvious one is suggested by its very name, retarder. You have to take extra precausions to get all the solvent out of the ink and the retarder just makes it that much harder to do. In other words, don't use it just because the ink rep told you too.

If your signs are always around the size you mentioned, you may get someone to build you a small "drying room", nothing more than something big enough to roll a standard rack into. A half an hour in a steady humidity and temperature controled environment may be all that you need to fix your problem.

Setting a bunch of dowels sticking out of an unused section of wall to manually "rack" them out standing up, with space in between, may be something else that might fit your condition.

Good Luck
Rocky

posted on: Mon, 11/28/2005 - 1:45pm
Anonymous says: No, I have actually hand built 10 drying racks that hold 100 each. I roll them beside the press, fill them and then roll them to the other end of the shop. Once I fill all 10, I close all the doors ...

No, I have actually hand built 10 drying racks that hold 100 each. I roll them beside the press, fill them and then roll them to the other end of the shop. Once I fill all 10, I close all the doors and turn on a huge fan, a dehumidifier and the air conditioner.
So are you saying to use the ink with no retarder? It is really thick and if I am running the press for 100 or 200 signs it is going to dry on screen if I am not careful right? That is why I was told to use the retarder, to give it more working time on the press. Any advice is greatly appreciated. I was almost at the point of either mortgaging the house and buying a uv dryer or just selling the press, my plotter and all of the associated stuff and going back to doing stained glass. But God stepped and turned our weather into something more to the liking of the ink on the signs. I figure now I have to crank out 10,000 signs a week to be able to pay off the press and afford a uv dryer by spring. I am working on it, and just trying to muddle thru til then

posted on: Thu, 12/01/2005 - 8:24am
Anonymous says: Try using a "thinner" instead of a "retarder" to make your ink viscisity more workable, and going to uv will not solve all your problems either. UV ink has its own set of unique issues that will take ...

Try using a "thinner" instead of a "retarder" to make your ink viscisity more workable, and going to uv will not solve all your problems either. UV ink has its own set of unique issues that will take you some time to master

posted on: Sat, 12/03/2005 - 11:31am
Anonymous says: Tammy, If your pulling 10,000 signs a week by hand you are sniffing too much retarder! Or your giving your work away? Having 10,000 signs a week around here would buy me a couple auto's a U.V. dryer ...

Tammy,
If your pulling 10,000 signs a week by hand you are sniffing too much retarder!
Or your giving your work away?
Having 10,000 signs a week around here would buy me a couple auto's a U.V. dryer and a house in about a month. I wouldn't be thinking about a 2nd mortage, I'd have the Bankers in town Fist Fighting each other over who would borrow me money!!

posted on: Mon, 12/05/2005 - 10:56pm
Anonymous says: Like what has been said, definitely use thinners instead of retarder, some companies even have fast thinners eg. sericol. However these may not be suited to halftones. What mesh count are you using? I ...

Like what has been said,
definitely use thinners instead of retarder,
some companies even have fast thinners eg.
sericol. However these may not be suited to
halftones.
What mesh count are you using?
I find I can get away with 140T p/cm(355tp/in)
How many coats of emulsion?
Putting down a too thick ink
film will also slow drying.

James

posted on: Wed, 12/07/2005 - 6:43am
Anonymous says: Ah yes, I remember this problem well. You are not alone. What's happening here is common to many harder plastic prints with solvent ink. The ink gets printed, the surface drys, but the ink underneath ...

Ah yes, I remember this problem well. You are not alone.

What's happening here is common to many harder plastic prints with solvent ink. The ink gets printed, the surface drys, but the ink underneath is still giving off solvents as it dries/cures.
With paper or other softer materials, the solvent can go into the material and dissapate.
With hard plastics, it can only go out through the top layer of dried ink, and this can take a while.
So when you print double sided, and then place the coro face to face, the ink is releasing the solvents through the top layer, but it has nowhere to go, and rewets the ink.
Solutions -
Less retarder more thinnner (find the balance, print fast)
Increase drying time
Fans over the surface, and heat - ensure the air in the shop is being exchanged, you need to get the solvent away from the ink layer.
Slip sheets if you are not confident they are completely cured/dried
stack loose and verticle in small quantitiies. Don't cut large stacks if you are trimming, and use minimum pressure in the cutter.
We used to do thousands of signs like these, and we shipped them in cardboard flats so they were standing up, not stacked on top of each other - the pressure and no air spaces are what will get you.

Good luck with it.

posted on: Sat, 12/31/2005 - 3:37pm
Anonymous says: What is it that you are using as a slip sheet and where do I get it. You say you use it for 2 sided signs, I have an order I am printing today for 900 2 sided and I take it that6 I need to put a sheet ...

What is it that you are using as a slip sheet and where do I get it. You say you use it for 2 sided signs, I have an order I am printing today for 900 2 sided and I take it that6 I need to put a sheet between each sign. So how do I do it so that I can streamline it to where I get a sheet between each sign? I need as much info on this as I can get and would appreciate the help.

posted on: Thu, 01/05/2006 - 12:05pm
Anonymous says: We just used cheap newsprint, you can buy it in sheets from any paper supplier, or pick up end rolls cheap from your local newspaper. Don't use anything glossy. make sure the ink is DRY before you put ...

We just used cheap newsprint, you can buy it in sheets from any paper supplier, or pick up end rolls cheap from your local newspaper.
Don't use anything glossy.
make sure the ink is DRY before you put them face to face and the sheet in between.
It's a pain, but sometimes less trouble than printing the job over or the ulcer you get from worrying it might stick.

Good luck

posted on: Sun, 01/08/2006 - 8:59pm
Anonymous says: This may sound simple but I've noticed that often fans on substrates that aren't absorbent dry the surface and inhibit the underneath ink from drying properly. It's like a jelly filled donut then. Try ...

This may sound simple but I've noticed that often fans on substrates that aren't absorbent dry the surface and inhibit the underneath ink from drying properly. It's like a jelly filled donut then. Try it without the fans and only heat/dehumidifier.

posted on: Mon, 01/09/2006 - 4:57pm

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