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Capilary film help

Posted on Thu, 23 Jan 2003 at 13:34



I need to be able to print a solid white circle (4") onto a mirror polished (extremely smooth) aluminum dial blank and I figured that capilary film as opposed to regular emulsion would help me to get good edge definition on the print.
We currently use 330 mesh with emulsion to print our dials. We never have used cap film here so I don't know what type and density would be the best.
Can any of you recommend one that might help me out?
TIA

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Comments

Anonymous says: Scott, Cap film is more expensive per screen for the materials, but you get edges that look like they were cut with a knife. The image spreads less, you get a harder dot and you wipe the screen less often. ...

Scott,
Cap film is more expensive per screen for the materials, but you get edges that look like they were cut with a knife. The image spreads less, you get a harder dot and you wipe the screen less often. You sacrifce some durability, but this can be overcome with a coating of emulsion on the inside of the screen. You should test 20 and 30 micron films for a 330 mesh. Read about the products at ulano.com, autotype.com and chromaline.com. I like ulano's CDF series. Some of the are photopolymer and expose very quickly; ideal for inferior light sources. Ask for samples and test.
Good luck,
Paul

posted on: Sun, 02/02/2003 - 9:40am
Anonymous says: It really is great to work with and provides all that Paul said. Just watch your cost's. Capillary film, all things being equal really is only cost effective for the specific benefits it has over direct ...

It really is great to work with and provides all that Paul said. Just watch your cost's. Capillary film, all things being equal really is only cost effective for the specific benefits it has over direct emulsion.

posted on: Fri, 02/07/2003 - 1:35pm
Anonymous says: Hello, I would like to know how long takes the film to dry. As well I would like to know if it is a good idea to use a fan to help this prosses. And my last question is, how sencitive to light is realy ...

Hello,
I would like to know how long takes the film to dry. As well I would like to know if it is a good idea to use a fan to help this prosses.
And my last question is, how sencitive to light is realy this film?

Regards,

-Fernando

posted on: Tue, 08/03/2004 - 3:45pm
Anonymous says: Fernando, Overnight is usually sufficient to dry unless you have a really humid environment. A fan does speed it along as does heat. You'll know if it's not dry enough when you try to peel the carrier ...

Fernando,
Overnight is usually sufficient to dry unless you have a really humid environment. A fan does speed it along as does heat. You'll know if it's not dry enough when you try to peel the carrier sheet and it doesn't want to cooperate. You can work with it in regular room lighting for a couple of minutes providing there isn't intense UV in the are, e.g. the sun or an exposure unit. Good luck.
Paul

posted on: Tue, 08/03/2004 - 3:52pm

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