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NEED HELP ...Coroplast Screening

Posted on Sat, 2 Apr 2005 at 17:47



I used to print shirts , and recently decided to screen coroplast signs ... WHAT A MESS !!

I am using 28"x36" screens ( maybe this is too small) ... and have tried 200, 255, 305 mesh. Tried Nazdar 59-000 ink & Cericol Ink.
So far I either get TOO MUCH ink and have to pry off the coroplast ( this does not give the ideal result ) ... or the ink SKIPS over the flukes ( I am printing ACROSS them, not with them).

I am helping the coroplast industry profits with my waste, but little else.

Would appreciate any advise on TWEEKING my operation. I am thinking my screens may not be large enough and since I am using a 1/8th inch ( or so ) OFF CONTACT, I may be expecting more elasticity from the screen than it is willing to give.

I doubt that I am going to be a real threat to the industry as a whole, so hopefully some of you KNOWLEDGABLE printers will pass along some knowledge and show me where I am going wrong.

Thanks ........... Richard

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Anonymous says: Welcome to the world of non-textile printing! I use Nazdar's 7900 series. It is a coro ink and works well. Use a higher mesh count screen. Use a minimum of 230 and depending on the detail, you should ...

Welcome to the world of non-textile printing!

I use Nazdar's 7900 series. It is a coro ink and works well.

Use a higher mesh count screen. Use a minimum of 230 and depending on the detail, you should be able to go up to a 305.

Your off-contact seems fine. You do need to print with the flute. Going against the flute will give you the white streaks. You must print with the flute for less problems.

Technically, you need a vacuum table to print these. When you use the vacuum table, it keeps your coro down, while you print.

You could get by because of the heaviness of the coro, but you would have to have you inks, consistently thin.

When using the inks out of the can, you have to thin it down. Use the appropriate thinner indicated and you should thin it down 10% - 15% by weight. Once it's thinner, it will stick less. Make sure your mesh is tight as well. Tensionable frames work best, but if you must use a pre-stretched frame, try to find aluminum and use a brand new one for the best tension.

When you are printing, make sure you print, then after printing, lift your screen and flood coat it. In the flood coat stage, it's not like a t-shirt. You don't want to leave ink on top of the image, just in the image. If you leave ink on top of the image, the weight of the ink will push through the screen causing a mess. To flood coat it, just push or pull the ink with firm pressure and the ink will not be left on the screen, but only in the print area.

You need to print pretty quickly. Some people say different things, but if you have a thinned down ink and you flood coat it properly, you don't have to move as fast. On the average, though, you should print 1 every 15 - 20 seconds. Again, though, with thinned ink and flood coating, this could be extended, not by much.

Make sure you have proper cleaning supplies on hand. Depending on how thin your artwork is, it will want to close up in areas, (or how slow you work). The proper cleaning supplies will help open the screen for you with minimal effort.

As for a vacuum table. You can build your own pretty simply. The tables have small holes usually drilled out about every inch. Then you place that board on strips on the ends of another board, creating a small area in the middle of the sandwhiched boards with nothing there. Then attach a shop vac or something similar to the bottom and you've created a vacuum table.

Good luck.

posted on: Mon, 04/04/2005 - 1:52pm

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